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20130105
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
of the civil rights movement and the birm birmingham children's mar pch which broke the back of the birmingham massive resistance against civil rights when you started to see the teenagers and the young people and you realized, oh, wait a minute the injustices to youth and families helps to galvanize the american consciousness, but as you pointed out, the biggest piece of it was showing a pathway to the administration legally of what to do, and when you look at the new action that the president and the administration have taken around families that will take effect in march, and what is after that? if we have younger family members addressed and some families addressed, it seems a lot of hole, and so how does the movement embodied by la raza start to move forward? >> well, obviously, we want to continue to move for the comprehensive immigration reform and have a law passed to deal with this in a permanent way. and the president's action while important step to provide relief to the young people, the dreamer, it is not permanent. we do need comprehensive immigration reform. and we are looking a
or the pro-gun control or the anti-gun control movement -- >> the civil rights movement -- >> the civil rights movement. >> the suffragette movement, women's rights, you've got to be organized. >> absolutely. you've got to be organized. and what we see, remember that 16% i identified as the alarmed? again people who are very concerned and think this is an urgent problem, but they feel relatively isolated and alone. they say, "i feel this way, some of my friends and family feel this strongly." but they have no sense that they're part of over 40 million americans that feel just as strongly as they do. they've never been properly organized, mobilized and directed to demand change. and i mean, that's what the political system ultimately responds to. if you basically have a vacuum of people who are demanding change, and i don't mean that truly. i mean, there are of course many great organizations that have been advocating for change for a long time. but it hasn't been a broad based citizens movement demanding change. in that situation a relatively small but well-funded and vocal community th
of the spectrum. if you think about the civil rights movement, the various feminism is about area. challenging the idea that there is a model of the american family. it went into a prolonged time a political crisis. stepped into the breach and proposes a new model of the american family. one that requires more protection and so the book really tells the story of the politicized american family that needs support economically one that needs protection morally. that's how i characterize the ship to a more conservative political culture. the critical difference between the pre-1960s and the post 1970s conservative model of the family really comes down to the role of the state. the role of our collective empowerment through the national government. the role that it plays in our lives. families require basic economic security. national government and state and local government play an important role in providing resources. that is part of the liberal model of the family itself. well, with conservatives the idea is a family that needs not economic protection, but more protection. that speaks to a ve
legal guys. avery freedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor and he joins us from las vegas. let me remind everyone here about the facts in this particular case. it's been a little while. james holmes charged with 166 counts of murder, attempted murder, and other offenses in that shooting rampage in a movie theater in -- near denver in july. 12 people were kill and dozens were injured in that attack. the preliminary hearing on monday is the first time the prosecutors will outline their case against him in detail. and the "denver post" is reporting that prosecutors have created a chart just to try to keep track of all the different victims and their injuries. hundreds of people are expected to attend this hearing. so let's get started. this hearing starts monday. but it could actually just last all week. it's a hearing, after all, not the trial. we're talking about a lot of new evidence and testimony. so, richard, let me start with you. what is the new stuff we expect to hear or see? >> marty
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
, as well as the college students were. and it was the height of the civil rights movement. the vietnam war. so many issues to become engaged in. so i started moving up the ladder at the college station, interned at a local all-news radio station, and that was the end of the violin. >> then you just kept working at it and loved it? >> it wasn't quite that simple. it was in a day when they did not hire women for newsroom jobs in broadcasting. period. there were a few anchor women, a few weather women, there were just not average run of the mill journalist assignment reporters, and i was told they weren't about to do it at this radio station, and i could go into advertising or promotion. i was accepted in the corporate trainee program, actually, and i said, hire me as a copy boy, which is what they -- they require copy. it's predigital -- back in the days of film and television and a very different era. so they give me the midnight to 8:00 shift, and said if i prove myself, there where no one would see me, i might -- and i worked my way up. i don't know if that's your experience as well. i i'
funded runaway slaves. she actually--some of the early landmark civil rights cases in california she funded. and then--and near the end of her life, things became even more bizarre. she was sort of connected to a very wealthy senator from--state senator from california and was taken to court and so it just becomes, you know, this saga. but as a figure, i mean, she's just inspirational and just formidable. c-span: $30, 643 pages for your book. where did you write it? >> guest: wrote it all over the world. i actually--you know, i was in north carolina after i did the initial traveling, i did some there. i went to new york where i had been living for 13 years. c-span: what were you doing in new york? >> guest: well, i taught at columbia and sarah lawrence college. i was for a year at the university--i'm sorry--at the american academy in rome, the rome prize. so that was where the bulk of it was actually completed. and oxford, mississippi, where i was a writer in residence. so i've toted around a lot of papers for a lot of years. c-span: faulkner does come up in your book. he used to liv
top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from top down change. when that top down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it m
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
and handed him a protest note expressing serious concern over the matter. >> human rights groups say it's time for the government in nepal to improve the rule of law and live up to the terms of reconciliation as part of the peace deal that ended the civil war. >> these violations cannot escape. we have been suffering from this problem of impunity in nepal, especially those crimes that took place during conflict. >> a u.n. report documented more than 9,000 cases of human rights violations by both government forces and maoist insurgents during the civil war that ended in 2006. a promise truth and reconciliation commission has not yet emerged nor has the law been changed to recognize torture as a crime. human rights watch says colonel kumar lama's arrest in britain sends out a warning to those accused of serious crimes that they cannot escape justice. >> a man's been arrested in northern ireland after shots were apparently fired at police. nine police officers were injured during overnight clashes inble fast and violence follows weeks of protest over a decision not fly the union flag all y
of -- the grimms never go out of style. >> that's right. finally, a civil war card collection. >> in wednesday's kids post, we tell the story of adam webb. he's 11 years old from manassas. the national park service, in honor of this civil war, put out a set of 189 trading cards, like the ones you see here. and adam collected all 189 from boston to south carolina. he collected all of them. he loves the civil war. he's a great story. he's in wednesday's kids post. >> impressive. all right, tracy, thanks as always. for more, visit nbcwashington.com or washingtonpost.com and click on kids post. that's kids post this week on tv. >> that was cool about the eagles. i like that. >> i've seen a few running along the river early last spring. i noticed i never really get that close to one in the wild. they're big. >> they're huge. >> i was just glad he didn't look like he wanted a runner on the menu. it was a big bird. >> a lot of people run outside during the winter. today could be a decent day. >> excellent running weather for winter standards around here. the sun is out. that's the most important thin
as possible and bring the human- rights violators to justice. it has been six years since the civil war came to an end. it could be true they have acted out of fear to get justice. the operator arrested in the universal jurisdiction is in vote when the government is considered unwilling or unable to take action against the perpetrator. in the case of nepal, it is different. the parties are still negotiating on the promise of the truth and reconciliation commission. >> if you were in charge of and your family and home were destroyed in a storm, the immediate problem is where to live and with him. a helping hand is what you need. in the philippines, thousands of orphans need special help. that is after the damage of a typhoon last month. we have a report from one of the worst hit areas. >> the christmas break is over. is the first week of school. these peoples are not attending regular classes yet. this is a special group counseling session for survivors. this 8-year-old lost six cousins during the typhoon. he says he would have been dead if his brother had not saved him. he watched his house
. in a statement, he said the protesters have the constitutional right to demonstrate. he also called on his partners to help preserve civil peace. but he shifted the blame on to parliament, and called on it to do with protesters' demands. but the mass rally seemed to have expanded. friday marked one of the biggest days of demonstrations that have taken part in the last two weeks in at least 15,000 cities across the country. they are calling for equality and the end to the targeting of zunis. when nothing less. -- sunnis, nothing less. >> a prominent shiite cleric reached out, to a mosque in baghdad. he also went to the catholic church attack in 2010 by sunni fighters. >> we have learned a big lesson from this church and our brother christians in iraq. want to return to peace than confront the terrorists who want to split religions in iraq. >> the leaders of sudan and south sudan are meeting in addis about a -- abbaba to negotiate border disputes. pseudonym and south sudan came close to war last year over the disputes. both accused each other of supporting rebels in each other's territories.
disarray. we're beyond division. we've got anarchy and very clearly defined tribal sectarian civil war in iraq. that's happening right now. but, most important, those men and women that we ask to fight and die, they deserve a policy worthy of their sacrifices. they, in my opinion, do not have that policy today. >> suarez: on "fox news sunday" last weekend, south carolina senator lindsey graham made clear that republicans have not forgotten or forgiven. >> i can tell you there would be very little republican support for his nomination. at the end of the day, there will be very few votes. >> suarez: meanwhile a group of republican and democratic officials have written to the president, expressing their support for hagel, and they're mounting a campaign with radio ads. >> i've know him since his early days in the senate. we have consulted and talked often about foreign policy. >> suarez: former ambassador thomas pickering is one of hagel's supporters. over a long career, he's gone through the confirmation process nine times. does this process that happens before a nomination and before a
killed in this civil war has been climbing steeply. one of the organizations keeping track is the syrian observer for human rights and its spokesman is mataz suheil. how many were you seeing a year ago. >> a year ago, we would see 60 people killed. yesterday was 200. the day before 100. the day bench that 210. >> reporter: driving that escalation in part, rebel fighters who have taken over civilian neighborhoods, turning them into battle zones. another factor it's syrian military is attacking more and more often from the air. when cbs news visited the damascus suburbs in november, sarah, a 21-year-old activist, showed us the damage done by a missile fired from a russian-made mig fighter plane. is that the worst, seeing a fighter plane overhead? >> yeah, the mig is the worst thing have ever happened to us. we can't have any safe place to hide. >> we see this as an attempt to either force migration or the depopulating entire zones. >> reporter: it's working, too. >> it is. >> reporter: half a million people have been sent fleeing already. and the united nations is predicting there will be
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
slaves and you're quite right, he never intended to free them, even if he had been in debt. but he did argue that to do so would be civil war and that the only solution would be a colonization scheme in which all slaves moved, whether it be the caribbean, west are back to africa. and of course you could argue that was just self-justification. but it's also a reason worth considering. i came at this very differently. as a scholar working on the british caribbean. these are some of the most brutal regimes anywhere. i was very aware that it never bothered about tomorrow's issue of slavery, never discussed it before and during the american revolution. the first place it's really discussed us here in america. and even perceives british abolition debate. and to be remarkable if slave regimes throughout history, but it's only in the western only in the 18 century that you have abolition movement, people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the sysadmin had in us empathy to realize that slaves freed with these so angry
's largest military machine, nato, right on the doorstep of this very brittle and brutal 21-month-long civil war. syrian regime shells landing inside turkey, prompting turkey's request to nato. that tension has died down. what has changed is the escalation in the conflict. rebels in the north pressing down hard on friday on a helicopter base, which they're trying to take to stop the regime's ability to project air power across the north. as the assad regime gets more desperate, many are concerned they'll reach into their arsenal, perhaps as the more deadly weapons inside, chemical weapons, which they deny having, scud-type missiles have already been used. purely to defend turkey, nato says. at the end of the day, as some say, they have skin in the game. perhaps were a shell to go astray, that may cause some ramifications for nato's patriot deployment there. all eyes watching this and certainly nato making the key point this is purely defensive. now certainly psychologically on what's happening in that border area. nick paton walsh, cnn, istanbul. >>> much more ahead this hour. >> here's what
. and then there are civil damages because he would admit to things he said he hasn't done. it's a very complicated situation and a very risky maneuver. >> right. we should point out the attorney that represents lance armstrong has said emphatically there are no discussions of the nature of which we're discussing here. in other words, that lance is going to somehow make a confession. but the thought of this is very enticing to many people, because i think until he says something publicly, that we're all -- there always will be doubters, won't there, don't you think? >> oh, absolutely, martin. i think we've seen other celebrities and athletes alleged to have done wrong things and there are always people who will stand by them. there were people who stood by pete rose for many years, although he ultimately admitted that he did engage in some of the gambling activities that baseball alleged of him. but i think there will always be supporters. but if lance armstrong comes out and says, you know what, i actually was doping, i was doing all of these things, it would be pretty sdas disastrous for his reputation. m
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)